Browse Tag: second hand

Year End Consignment Update

Thrift Spending:

December 1st – $0
December 7th – $0
December 14th – $43
December 21st – $0
December 28th – $11

Total purchases: $54

Total income: $770

Number of items consigned: 34

Consignment Income $770 – Spending $54 = Month End Balance $716

A Year In Review

In 2016 I consigned 1044 items (say what!) and made $9244 return, but I spent $719 on goodies throughout the year. My best sales month was June with $1136 return and my worst month was February with only a $324 return. Holy moly! Every month I get increasingly better with my consignment choices but as you know most of it is just pure luck. You never know if Cinderella will walk into the store and find your items or not.

I feel like I am becoming more and more aware of my style and budget, really deciding if I want the item before I buy. I used to be more free spirited about it and think “Oh I’ll just consign it if I don’t like it”… but then you’ll discover a stain or a rip and you can’t consign it. Its a challenge with every haul there are going to be sacrifices as you can’t always closely examine every square inch of everything you buy.

All in all it was a very successful year for the challenge, I only blew my goal once or twice, ultimately coming under my goal (often by a long shot). In looking at the numbers every month it gives a better idea of the “best case scenario” of using consignment for your unwanted clothing and a little extra money. It also shows you that you can’t be upset with not making a lot on each item, many of the items I sold I got under $5 for. At the store we always say quantity is everything – because it is. You can’t expect a huge dollar value if you have only a handful of items for sale. If you have a lot to get rid of you’ll see a higher number. But then again, its all relative.

Monthly Consignment Update

Thrift Spending:

June 1st – $0
June 6th – $0
June 13th – $0
June 20th – $0
June 27th – $0

Total purchases: $0

Consignment Income:

June 1 through 5th – $133
June 6th through 12th – $362
June 13th through 19th – $250
June 20th through 26th – $306
June 27th through 30th – $85

Total income: $1136

Number of items consigned: 80

Consignment Income $1136 – Spending $0 = Month End Balance $1136


When you buy a house your priorities change. What can I say? I turned my focus 100% towards renovating and moving into my new home and completely ignored the thrift stores. I imagine the day will come when I feel the urge to shop, but right now I am looking at clearing out – styling what I currently have and making my yard sale finds new!

Monthly Consignment Update

Thrift Spending:

April 14th – $15
April 24th – $20

Total purchases: $35

Consignment Income:

April 1 through 10th – $206
April 11 through 17th – $195
April 18 through 24th – $349
April 25 through 30th – $94

Total income: $844

Number of items consigned: 105

Consignment Income $844 – Spending $35 = Month End Balance $809


What I have learned recently is that it does pay to save off season thrifted items to consign. A lot of our clients are of the mindset “I’m clearing out, I want it gone now!” Which is fair and understandable. However, it is summer and you are trying to “get rid of” your very nice winter wears, you could simply throw them all into a Rubbermaid bin to store until the proper season and make some cash! When you do consign right (based on the store) you can make a great supplement income with minimal effort involved.

Even a return of $2 on an item is $2 more than you had before. The better the item, the faster it sells, the greater the return value. Some items I can get $18 for, some I get $2… it is a gamble but like I said, its more than you had just throwing it away. Now having said that, sometimes things don’t sell at all and you have to donate it anyway. Nothing lost!

 

Monthly Consignment Update

Thrift Spending:

March 28th – $34

Total purchases: $34

Consignment Income:

March 1 through 6th – $141
March 7 through 13th – $241
March 14 through 20th – $269
March 21 through 27th – $148
March 28 through 31st – $133

Total income: $932

Number of items consigned: 144

Consignment Income $932 – Spending $34 = Month End Balance $898


I’m at a loss for words what can I say? When I set my mind to do something I follow through full tilt. Since deciding to purchase my first home (which I haven’t found yet!) I have completely put a halt on my spending. I visited Value Village maybe twice this month and only spent $34… I also sold some items on Kijiji which just increased my home savings.

I think the boost in sales is mostly in part to finally being able to consign spring items which in my opinion sell far better than anything else. Everyone here is chomping at the bit for warmer weather and sunshine! It does pay to save your off-season items!

How Consignment Works

I am often asked about how I can afford to thrift as much as I do, they suggest my wardrobe is massive and bursting at the seams. I buy a lot of clothes, that we will admit up front. But I am buying clothing at a fraction of the retail price so you need to change your way of calculating. I only buy secondhand knowing that I get bored of things and change my style frequently. I also have the ability to open up my closet on any given day and pull out a ton of pieces that are not screaming my name.

Most people are not able to be this brutal as most people think of how much they spent and have an emotional attachment to things. The most emotional attachment I have ever felt with clothing is my inability to wear it after experiencing something traumatic or unpleasant in that outfit. For instance if someone broke your heart and the red dress was their favourite, you’re not likely going to want to wear it again because it will remind you. I have had a few items that have been tainted by experience so I need to remove them from my closet.

Don’t get me wrong I do donate a lot of items, but many items are still in great condition and worthy of generating extra cash. In working at a consignment store I know exactly what to look for and what will sell to our clientele. Each store has its own processes and requirements, so I can only speak to our way of doing things. Let me tell you a little bit about how consignment works.

Lightly worn items are brought into the store clean, pressed and ready to go on hangers. These are items that are in style, in season and purchased within the last two years. My job is to analyze each item that is brought in to decide if it is suitable for resale, quality and if we would potentially have a buyer for it. Once I decide to keep an item I change it over to our hangers and double check that there are no stains, rips or flaws. Once I have processed all the items I return the hangers along with any “no thank yous”. Continue Reading

Tips for Thrift Shopping


If you cannot view the video above, please check it out on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TwYxutG-jJg

The number one question a thrift-lover is asked on a regular basis is: “How do you ever find anything?!” The thing about thrifters is we don’t see these shops as gross, we look past the scent lingering in the air from unwashed clothing, we see the limitless potential in every piece we see. The fun is in the search, the reward is discovering that magical piece whether its clothing, home decor or furniture. In these stores it is all one of a kind and to me, that’s something special.

I’ve watched plenty of YouTube videos and read plenty of blogs regarding the do’s and don’ts of thrift shopping. They all have similar points but a few I would disagree with based on how I go about it.

Try it on or wear your thrifting uniform

I used to load up a cart with items that looked like they would fit, I was pretty certain I was about this size and if not well I didn’t spend much so it’s okay. Its this attitude that gets you spending and wasting. More recently I have been taking the time to try things on, even if its just over top of my clothing. Now I don’t have a thrifting uniform (leggings, tank top as your base layers with easy to slip off shoes) I just go after work so whatever I’m wearing is how it is. Granted, this doesn’t make it easy usually for trying things on – so I have to really love it before I go through the effort in the change room.

Continue Reading

Vlog: Thrift Haul #2 – Salvation Army

If you cannot view the video above please check it out on YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vlHv4zQD4hI

I did not start out my day with thrift shopping in mind, quite honestly I knew the Value Village 50% off days were coming up so I thought I should behave. While I was out running errands (on a Saturday – gasp!) I thought seeing as I had time I would stop in and check out the prices at the local Salvation Army. Although it has improved greatly I find it to be a challenging place to shop.

For me the low prices would make up for the difficulty of searching through racks. Its a smaller shop than Value Village, but it seems to be organized in just basics: women’s tops, women’s pants, dresses… As much as I am not big on sizes and labels I do find it far more calming to shop when you start in one size and gradually work to another. They have standard pricing for the most part, most tops were $4.50 from what I could tell – which is still a great price but a challenge to find!

The pricing as I’ve said before, is not what it used to be when I shopped as a child – before “thrifting” was cool. A top would be $1, $2… you would leave with a full bag! Now you have to decide between this and that to keep it under $10. Quite sad really that the charity based shops had to pump prices up to compete with the big leagues.

My First Vlog!

As I’m sure you can guess I didn’t have any choice of thumbnail for the preview of this video – sadly you need to build up a subscriber base in order to use a variety of functions on YouTube! Oh well this is all a learning curve! New for 2016 I am breaking into the unique world of YouTube and video blogging, with a new camera and wardrobe setup, I’m pretty excited to see where this takes me!

Now, enjoy my crazy facial expressions in this nerve-racking introductory vlog!

Check out the new ThriftLove YouTube Channel

Thrift Life

I have done a lot of reading in the past year about finances, budget lifestyle and ways women have reshaped their spending habits. I find myself disheartened at each one because of the way most regard being thrifty. Some call it being cheap, others being financially savvy. Maybe I am money conscious, or perhaps a more political stance of not wanting to encourage the overpricing of goods or the supporting of businesses with inhumane practices.

The most recent article I came across on Facebook was that of Ayssa Barrette, “7 Eye Opening Lessons I Learned From Buying Nothing New For 200 Days” as posted on Collective Evolution. Knowing her background in environmental sustainability I can understand her points made in her article, however I can’t help but feel dissatisfied. Continue Reading